2010 Final exam Fall 2018

This final exam is worth fifteen points.

As we’ve discussed during the semester, the exam consists of you sending your final proposal in a business letter format to your audience.

To demonstrate that you have sent it, either CC or BCC me on an email to your audience, or have me watch you put a hard copy into an addressed, stamped envelope. Once the envelope is sealed, I’ll put it in the mail for you.

The late paper policy, as written on the syllabus, applies to the final exam. Turn the exam in on time by demonstrating you’ve sent it before the end of the final exam period which corresponds to your section number on the 11th of December. The exam times are listed at the end of the syllabus. As long as I’m CC’ed, emailing the final exam demonstrates that you’ve sent it.

I will be in my office (CB 407 F) during the final exam period if you need to visit with me in person.

If you have questions about any of this, please contact me.

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3420 Final exam Fall 2018

This take-home final exam is worth fifteen points. The late paper policy as described by the syllabus applies to the final exam. Turn the exam in by emailing it to me before it is due. It is due by the end of the final exam period. When you email the exam, include “English 3420,” the phrase “final exam,” and your name in the subject line.

For the final exam, submit a short story for publication and document that submission.

As you are researching venues for publication, be sure to select venues that are likely to publish your work. Pick a publication that will email you an acknowledgment of your submission. For the final, email a copy of that acknowledgment to me following the guidelines above.

If you have questions about this final, please contact me.

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2250 Final exam Fall 2018

This take-home final exam is worth fifteen points. The late paper policy as described by the syllabus applies to the final exam. Turn the exam in by emailing it to me before it is due. It is due by the end of the final exam period. When you email the exam, include “English 2250” or “English 225H,” the phrase “final exam,” and your name in the subject line.

For the final exam, submit poems and a short story for publication and document those submissions. If you are taking this class as part of UVU’s Honors Program, you are required to submit and document two stories and two sets of poems. Each story and set of poems should be submitted to different publications.

As you are researching venues for publication, be sure to select venues that are likely to publish your work. Pick a publication that will email you an acknowledgment of your submission. Most will do so automatically, but receiving an acknowledgement is your responsibility. For the final, email a copy of that acknowledgment to me following the guidelines above.

If you have questions about this final, please contact me.

 

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2010 Synthesis

Here are two examples of synthesis extracted from longer essays. Answer these questions about them:

  1. What phrases let readers know two sources are being synthesized? Quote three.
  2. What language would you not use when writing a synthesis given your audience? Why not?
  3. How well must the sources be understood to synthesized?
  4. Looking back at your annotated bibliography, what connections between sources did you describe? Can you develop those connections into a synthesis?

Then, try writing one. Begin by answering these questions:

  1. What do at least two of your sources have in common? Ideas? Facts? Example? Statistics?
  2. Are any people or works cited in more than one source?
  3. Does one source provide details, examples, or explanations that build on something said in another source?
  4. Does any source respond to something said or implied in another?
  5. What point from your proposal can you support through synthesis?
  6. What context might a synthesis you write provide?

Draft a synthesis for your proposal.

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Quick emergency rough drafts

Here are some steps toward a quick rough draft. Read all the steps first. Make a quick, tentative plan before you start.

Quick beginnings:

  • Start with an interesting bit of language
    1. Something you overheard eavesdropping or
    2. A phrase that is stuck in your head
  • Start with a character’s name and with that character doing something
  • Put something you like in the story
  • Put a thing or situation that makes you nervous in the story
  • Start with an accusation or an interdiction

Quick middles:

  • Make things
    1. Complicated for the main character
    2. Worse for the main character
  • Let the character think about
    1. Their actions
    2. The events of the story
    3. Another character
  • Show power shift as a result of a character’s action
  • Show power shift again as a result of an action
  • Show power shifting once more
  • Coincidences and dreams
    1. Can get characters into trouble
    2. But never out of it

Quick endings:

  • Show power shifting irrevocably
    1. Always with the main character as a primary witness
    2. As a result of the character’s action
  • Show at least one of the following
    1. A process begun earlier in the story is completed
    2. A restatement/return/echo of language from earlier in the story
    3. The main question or central tension in the story is resolved
  • Clearly show a change in the character or a reversal of roles
  • Resolve the question of “what’s going to happen” in a brief summary

 

Include many, many images.

Be willing to revise extensively and repeatedly.

 

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2250 Beginnings, middles, ends

Here are two examples for your consideration.

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Poems by Hass, Jones, Kooser, and Laux. Also, Russell, Levine, and Willard.

Enjoy. Also, see these for examples of images.

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