IVY LEAGUE REVISION

If you know the source of these links and this commentary, please let me know so I can offer proper attribution.

Harvard’s set of revision tips:

http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~wricntr/documents/Revising.html

An original <moderately amusing> contribution from Harvard: the “Backward Outline.” Check it out.

Yale’s Tips in Senior Essay Handout:

http://www.yale.edu/history/documents/2008-2009SrEssayHandbook.pdf

An original <puzzling> thought from Yale: See “Polishing the Rough Draft” on p. 35. “What do subheads tell you?” (I don’t know. What do they tell you?)

Princeton’s set of revision tips:

http://web.princeton.edu/sites/writing/Writing_Center/handouts/html/Revision.htm

An <almost> original idea from Princeton: Levels of Revision: Ideas Before Sentences and Mechanics” While revising prose is important, don’t restrict your revision to checking the clarity of individual sentences. Remember, there’s no point in spending a lot of time refining your sentences if your ideas are sloppy and disorganized, and if you’re going to end up cutting those sentences once you’ve straightened out what you want to say.

Dartmouth’s set of revision tips:

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~writing/materials/student/ac-paper/revise.html#objectivity

A scintillating <cozy> idea from Dartmouth: “Get a second reader.” A second reader can do a lot for you: she can tell you where she got bored, or confused, or offended, and she can give you advice for improving your work. Remember, though: when you ask someone to read your work, you should be prepared for any criticism they might make. Don’t be defensive.

Oxford’s Tips:

http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/shw/revision.shtml

A jolly good <mental health> tip from Oxford: Reduce anxiety! Revise subjects that make you feel anxious fairly early on so that you reduce the anxiety and feel you have the time to deal with them. It may be best not to do them first however but to begin with something you know well to boost your confidence. Never leave subjects that cause you anxiety till the last minute.

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